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The U.S. Can't Really Know If Farmers Are Cutting Back On Antibiotics, GAO Says

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 09:20:00 +0000

When the Food and Drug Administration created controls in January on how farmers can give antibiotics to livestock, scientists concerned about antibiotic resistance and advocates for animal welfare called it a historic shift in how meat animals are raised. But a new federal report , released last week, says the long-awaited FDA initiative — first attempted back in 1977 — falls short in so many areas that it may not create the change that backers hoped for. The FDA initiative, which was created by several documents called Guidances and is usually called its "judicious use" program , made it impossible for livestock producers to use routine micro-doses of antibiotics known as growth promoters. Those doses speed up the time it takes to get chickens, swine and cattle to the weight they are slaughtered at, without preventing or treating illness. Multiple lines of research have shown that growth promoters allow bacteria in animals' systems to develop resistance to antibiotics. Those bacteria

U.K. Ambassador On Parliament Attack

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 09:04:00 +0000

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Israel Arrests Suspect In Threats Against Jewish Community Centers

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 09:04:00 +0000

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Can Arianna Huffington Save Uber?

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 09:04:00 +0000

Uber is in crisis. This week the president resigned, after just six months on the job. Morale has been shaken, following a damning account of sexual harassment. The board of directors is so concerned about the CEO's ability to lead, they're looking for a No. 2 to help steer the company. And now — in a curious plot twist — media mogul Arianna Huffington is emerging as chief of Uber's campaign for culture change. The company decided to hold a conference call on Tuesday with reporters. Huffington, who joined the board of Uber almost a year ago, led the call and explained at the outset that the purpose was "not to create yet more headlines." Uber employees tell NPR they've seen a dramatic shift in Huffington's leadership. For the first several months of her tenure, she had not been a high profile presence at the company. Then about four weeks ago, a female engineer who was a former employee wrote a detailed open letter alleging she was sexually harassed and management refused to step in.

Trump Calls On GOP To Pass Health Care Or Leave The ACA In Place

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 09:04:00 +0000

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Elizabeth Warren Says GOP Health Plan Helps 'The Millionaires And Billionaires'

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 09:04:00 +0000

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Republicans Still Divided Over Health Care Bill

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 09:04:00 +0000

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Rep. Schweikert Pushing For A Yes On Health Care Bill

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 09:04:00 +0000

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Recapping The Week In Politics And What's Ahead

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 09:04:00 +0000

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GOP Resurrects A Bill From 2003 To Help Small Firms Buy Health Insurance

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 09:00:00 +0000

In a bid to improve the health insurance purchasing clout of small businesses, Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives dusted off a piece of controversial legislation more than a decade old and passed it this week as part of their effort to remake the market after they throw out the Affordable Care Act. The bill, the Small Business Health Fairness Act of 2017 , had the support of 232 Republicans and 4 Democrats. It now heads to the Senate, where its fate is uncertain, experts say. The earlier bill, which passed the House in 2003 but didn't advance, was widely panned by groups representing consumers, providers, the health insurance industry and state officials. At the time, they argued that it would do little to enhance the coverage options or control costs of many small businesses, especially those that employ older, sicker workers. Also, the critics said, the proposal would weaken consumer protections against plan insolvency and fraud. Health policy analysts say there's no

This Week In Race: ICE Sends Chills Across US, Kaepernick, Others, Write Big Checks

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 08:01:00 +0000

Oh people: it's been one of those weeks again. The focus on immigration continues, as the government promises to punish sanctuary cities and cities that have chosen not to do ICE's work for it by detaining undocumented immigrants until that agency can collect them for deportation. A number of police departments, including the LAPD, have indicated widespread fear of deportation in immigrant communities has had deleterious effects on how the police do their jobs. Stories like this one just increase the anxiety . In LA, reports from victims of sexual assaults are down 25 percent from this time last year . The prevailing theory is that victims, many undocumented (or from mixed-status families), are afraid that if they come forward, they'll expose themselves to deportation, which will separate them from their loved ones. And while much of the focus has been on deportations of Latinx, other groups have been under increased scrutiny. The Atlanta Black Star notes black African immigrants —

Faulty Corps ‘Fact’ Sheet On Port Everglades Dredge Drawing Fire

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 02:42:50 +0000

In advance of a $374 million dredging project at Port Everglades, the U.S. Corps of Engineers published a fact sheet last month to help the public understand the work and risks posed to coral and other marine life. But it turns out some answers in the Frequently Asked Questions section were wrong or incomplete. A photograph reportedly showing healthy coral after the PortMiami dredge was actually taken six months before dredging started. And a description of the Corps’ efforts in Miami, which it plans on replicating in Fort Lauderdale, said the agency followed environmental rules. But during the work in Miami, the Corps was repeatedly warned by federal and state wildlife agencies that dredging the port had killed far more coral than allowed under a permit and needed to be corrected. After Miami Waterkeeper — which threatened to sue to get the Corps to revise its assessment of potential damage — complained, the Corps removed the FAQ. But the agency never alerted the public about the

Animal Instincts

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 01:54:49 +0000

OUR ZOO - Drama - Based on a true story about George Mottershead and his dreams of creating a cage-free zoo, the impact it has on his family and how their lives changed when they embarked on the creation of Chester Zoo.

After Delaying Vote, GOP Leaders Scramble To Save Health Care Bill

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 01:21:00 +0000

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: Republican leaders in Washington are scrambling to save their bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. The House of Representatives was supposed to vote on the health care bill today, but with Republicans divided over just how far they should go with their changes, the vote was postponed. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis is following all this at the Capitol. Hi there, Sue. SUSAN DAVIS, BYLINE: Hey, Kelly. MCEVERS: So a lot is still happening there. Tell us. What's the latest? DAVIS: So the latest is House Republicans are actually gathered right now in the basement of the Capitol. They're about to break up because the House is going back into session, and the White House is putting pressure to bear on Republicans. His budget director, Mick Mulvaney, a former congressman, was inside the room meeting with Republicans. And my sources inside the room told me that Mulvaney's message to Republicans was very

House Postpones Vote On Republican Health Care Bill

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 01:21:00 +0000

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: And to help us understand what's happening on Capitol Hill tonight, I am joined by NPR's Ron Elving. Hello there, Ron. RON ELVING, BYLINE: Good to be with you, Kelly. MCEVERS: So tonight the president threatened that if the House does not vote on this tomorrow and does not pass their own health care bill, that he is going to move on and leave Obamacare in place. How serious a threat is that do you think? ELVING: It sounds pretty serious. It is certainly an escalation in the war of words over all this. But you know, if you've read "The Art Of The Deal," you know that Donald Trump is not averse to the art of the bluff. So we don't know. Would he really be willing to walk away from the entire issue of health care and the entire promise that he made and the entire Republican Party has been making for the last seven years to repeal Obamacare and replace it? One wonders. MCEVERS: I mean what are the options right now for House

Screwworm Response For Key Deer Winding Down

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 01:15:51 +0000

Self-medicating stations meant to protect the endangered Key deer from screwworm have already been removed and federal wildlife managers plan to stop medicating entirely on April 10 — assuming no new cases of the deadly parasite are found. Screwworm was first confirmed in the Keys Sept. 30 and killed 135 Key deer, an endangered species that lives nowhere else in the world. Before the outbreak, the population was estimated at 800 to 1,000 animals. Read more: Victory In The War Over Screwworm: Keys Animal Quarantaine Lifted Since then, state and federal agricultural agencies have released more than 147 million sterile screwworm flies, mostly in the Keys. That's the proven method for eradicating screwworm. The outbreak in the Keys was the first in the U.S. in more than 30 years. Staff from the National Key Deer Refuge plan to keep watching the Key deer for signs of screwworm and will keep tracking the deer that were fitted with radio collars in January. The refuge also has cameras in

Speaker Urges Governor To Suspend Orlando Area Prosecutor That Refuses To Seek Death Penalty

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:57:59 +0000

House Speaker Richard Corcoran is doubling down on tough talk about Orange County State Attorney Aramis Ayala. Corcoran says her blanket decision not to seek the death penalty crosses a line and he urges Florida Governor Rick Scott to suspend the prosecutor. “So she has that right to say in this particular case for these reasons we’ve decided not to seek the death penalty,” Corcoran says. “That’s not what she’s said,” he goes on, “She has said I do not believe in the death penalty—which is in our constitution. I wouldn’t seek it for the victims of Pulse, I’m not going to seek for this individual case, and won’t seek it at all in all cases.” “That’s violating the constitution.” Ayala’s refusal to seek the death penalty has riled Republicans across the state and prompted the governor to assign a new prosecutor to Markeith Loyd’s murder trial. Loyd led police on a nine day manhunt and stands accused of murdering his pregnant ex-girlfriend and a police officer. Copyright 2017 WFSU-FM. To

Stand Your Ground Changes, Gun Bills Head To House Floor

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:54:15 +0000

A number of NRA-backed bills are now headed to the House floor. That includes a bill making changes to Florida’s Stand Your Ground law and another allowing guns on private school property.

Constitution Revision Commission Sets Public Meetings

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:53:17 +0000

The Constitution Revision Commission has scheduled a series of public meetings throughout the state. Voter input will shape any amendments the group proposes.

Lawmakers Pushing Efforts To Curb Opioid Overdoses

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:52:27 +0000

Both prescription and illegal opioids are driving a national spike in overdose deaths. According to the Centers for Disease Control, they were involved in more than 33,000 deaths in 2015. Florida has seen a dramatic increase in opioid-driven overdoses, up more than 20 percent. Yet, lawmakers are still grappling with how to address the issue.